Josefina and Jeffery Crochet Elephant Rug 2017 Pattern Update

Hello fellow crocheters, I am happy to announce that 2017 version of our Josefina & Jeffery Elephant Rug Pattern has been released! We are very thankful to everyone who participated in pattern testing, proofreading, and tech editing.

Josefina and Jeffery Crochet Elephant Rug by IraRott - 2017 Pattern Update

2017 Elephant Rug Pattern Update

WHAT’S NEW:

  • The pattern is now 6 pages shorter with straightforward directions

  • Improved diagrams

  • New step by step photos

  • Clickable table of contents & page references throughout

  • New edging instructions for the ears

  • Notes for left-handed crocheter

Pattern updates are available for free to all previous buyers. Please check your emails if you’ve purchased this pattern through IraRott.com, IraRott on Ravalry, or IraRott on Craftsy. If for some reason you haven’t received an update, please contact us with your request through –> this form on our site & we will be more than happy to re-send it to you.

Dear Etsy customers, you are also eligible for a free update! Unfortunately, Etsy does not have an automated update feature just yet, but we hope they consider adding it in the future as per many of our survey suggestions. At the present time, we are sending etsy pattern updates manually and by requests only. If you’ve purchased this pattern through our ETSY SHOP, please send us a message through etsy or fill out the form below:

The color possibilities & yarn ideas are endless for this rug. Check out Josefina & Jeffery pattern page on RAVELRY to see finished projects made from this pattern by different crafters and please do not forget to add your project as well.

This pattern calls for working with 3 strands of medium weight yarn. You can find some easy tips on working with multiple strands of yarn at once –> HERE. If you are not comfortable working with 3 strands or you are trying to change finished size, just use any thicker or thinner yarn (1, 2, or 3 strands) with any suitable hook to make this rug bigger or smaller. The finished size & yarn qty will vary depending on the materials used & your tension.

TIP: Make the ears one-of-a-kind by changing colors frequently in any round, it’s a great project for using up your yarn leftovers.

Josefina and Jeffery Crochet Elephant Rug by IraRott - 2017 Pattern Update

Our Josefina & Jeffery pattern collection is constantly growing and we now have 9 adorable elephant patterns! Would you like to see more elephants at IraRott.com? We would be happy to hear your suggestions for our future designs.

Josefina and Jeffery Crochet Elephant Rug by IraRott - 2017 Pattern Update
Josefina and Jeffery Crochet Elephant Rug by IraRott - 2017 Pattern Update

Happy crafting!

Crochet Gauge Fix – Flat Circles

Why don’t the edges of a crochet circle lay flat when you followed the instructions correctly using the recommended hook size and yarn? There are a few reasons that may cause ruffling or tightening of the edges, but no worries, we also have some easy solutions to fix these issues 🙂

Crochet Gauge Fix - Tutorial by IraRott

The formulas for making flat crochet circles are very simple, there are no secrets:

  • Any double crochet (dc) circle begins with 12 stitches & increases by 12 in every round (12, 24, 36, 48, etc).
  • Any half double crochet (hdc) circle begins with 8 stitches & increases by 8 in every round (8, 16, 24, 32, etc).
  • Any single crochet (sc) circle begins with 6 stitches & increases by 6 in every round (6, 12, 18, 24, etc).

The formulas above are often adapted for different designs; for example, to make ovals, squares, hexagons, or other shapes. One of my personal preferences regarding sc formula is that I often increase by 12 in every other round instead of increasing by 6 in every round, which makes increases smooth and almost invisible.

Ok, let’s start our check list 🙂

  • RUFFLED CIRCLE – UNCONVERTED STITCHES: 

Remember to always check what terminology is used in the pattern to avoid unexpected “Oops”. Per se, if you learned to crochet using UK standards and you followed a pattern that was written in US terms (without converting it), then your dc circle will have ruffled edges as shown below.

Crochet Gauge Fix - Ruffled Dc Circle

Here is a simple chart that will help you to convert patterns:

US vs UK Crochet Terms - Conversion Chart by IraRott

  • RUFFLED CIRCLE – WORKING BETWEEN STITCHES: 

Be sure to insert the hook under the top 2 loops of the stitch (unless otherwise specified). Working in the space between the stitches will change the gauge and your circle will be ruffled.

Crochet Gauge Fix - Ruffled Dc Circle Crochet Gauge Fix - Ruffled Dc Circle

WHAT IS GAUGE?

Gauge is an important part of a pattern that indicates the number of stitches and rows per inch/centimeter. Always check the gauge and your total stitch count to ensure the correct result. Try using a smaller or larger hook if you need to obtain the gauge. If that doesn’t help, here is the key for changing your tension:

  • The height of the stitches can be adjusted by the length of the first loop that you pull through the stitch to create a new stitch.
  • The width of the stitches can be adjusted by the hook size or by the looseness/tightness of the last loop on the hook.

Crochet Gauge Fix - Flat Dc Circle

  • DOME SHAPED CIRCLE – GAUGE FIX: 

If your crochet circle has a dome shape it means your stitches are too tall or too narrow. REASONS – The first loop is too loose and the last loop is too tight.

Crochet Gauge Fix - Dome Shape Dc Circle

Here are some tips on how to fix a dome shaped circle:

Double crochet corrections – Yo; insert the hook in st; yo and pull up a loop a little lower than you normally do; [yo and pull through 2 loops] 2 times. The last loop on the hook should not be too tight.

Half double crochet corrections – Yo; insert the hook in st; yo and pull up a loop a little lower than you normally do; yo and pull through all loops on the hook. The last loop on the hook should not be too tight.

Single crochet corrections – Insert the hook in st; yo and pull up a loop a little lower than you normally do; yo and pull through all loops on the hook. The last loop on the hook should not be too tight.

Crochet Gauge Fix - Dome Shape Dc Circle

  • RUFFLED CIRCLE – GAUGE FIX: 

If your circle ruffles, it means your stitches are too short or too wide. REASONS – The first loop is too tight and the last loop is too loose.

Crochet Gauge Fix - Ruffled Dc Circle

Here are some tips on how to fix a ruffled circle:

Double crochet corrections – Yo; insert the hook in st; yo and pull up a loop a little higher than you normally do; [yo and pull through 2 loops] 2 times. The last loop on the hook should not be too loose.

Half double crochet corrections – Yo; insert the hook in st; yo and pull up a loop a little higher than you normally do; yo and pull through all loops on the hook. The last loop on the hook should not be too loose.

Single crochet corrections – Insert the hook in st; yo and pull up a loop a little higher than you normally do; yo and pull through all loops on the hook. The last loop on the hook should not be too loose.

Crochet Gauge Fix - Ruffled Dc Circle

USEFUL TIP: If your finished circle does not lay perfectly flat but you have already finished a large amount of work…no need to rush frogging it, just try to block it and you might be surprised by the result! Find wet blocking instruction in this –> ARTICLE on our blog.

Picot Joining As You Go

Happy last day of June, crafters! We still have a lot of time to enjoy long summer days and crochet our big projects. I am so excited to introduce our NEW Josefina and Jeffery elephant blanket pattern! Don’t you just love the colorful border? There are no exact duplicates of multicolored flower motifs. It’s such a great project for using up your yarn scraps!

Josefina and Jeffery Elephant Blanket Crochet Pattern by IraRott

This blanket is made from individually crocheted motifs using “joining as you go” technique where hexagon motifs are joined through the picot stitches of the last round. If you are new to crochet, you might like to check out our video tutorial for making a picot stitch –> HERE.

Picot JOIN is basically the same as picot stitch, except the beginning ch-3 is replaced with “ch 1 + sl st in the corresponding picot of previously made motif + ch 1“. Complete the stitch as you would normally finish a regular picot.

Here is a short “HOW-TO” video for you 🙂

Josefina and Jeffery crochet elephant blanket pattern has just been released & is included in our final promotion of Canada 150 celebration! Please check out our SPECIALS page for more information.

Josefina Elephant Blanket Crochet Pattern by IraRott

Josefina and Jeffery Elephant Blanket Crochet Pattern by IraRott

 

Canada 150 Celebration – 15 Days Of Specials

Join us for 15 days of specials to celebrate Canada’s 150th birthday! Each day we will  be offering a different promotion, so drop by our Facebook or SPECIALS page to check out all daily deals.

Canada 150 Celebration - 15 Days Of Specials by IraRott

Fantastic news – our Canadian Maple Leaf Backpack and Beret Crochet Pattern is now FREE!

Canada 150 Celebration - 15 Days Of Specials by IraRott

John the Canadian Bear is one of our most popular patterns & it’s on sale for a limited time. Enjoy our special price until June 18, 23:59 (EST)! It is always more fun in the sun to have a buddy with you to share the excitement of summer.

Canada 150 Celebration - 15 Days Of Specials by IraRott Canada 150 Celebration - 15 Days Of Specials by IraRott

Don’t miss out, stop by to see what will be the next deal of the day!

Canada 150 Celebration - 15 Days Of Specials by IraRott Canada 150 Celebration - 15 Days Of Specials by IraRott

Happy Canada 150!

 

 

Rusty the Giraffe Crochet Amigurumi

Hello, crochet friends, this is Rusty the Giraffe! He is our latest but not the least addition to IraRott® giraffes family. I promise, there will be more giraffes!

Rusty the Giraffe

Rusty the Giraffe

I had so much fun creating these cuties from Bernat Blanket yarn by Yarnspiration. As I mentioned in my previous blog article, this yarn never disappoints!

Hooray…I love their long flexible legs, chubby cheeks & butts! These guys are 32″ tall in sitting position or 44″ including legs.

If you wish to make a smaller size amigurumi, our pattern can easily be adapted for worsted weight yarn, here are a few alteration tips on how to make an 18″ giraffe:

  1. Recommended yarn – 1 skein of Bernat Super Value (or any other similar yarn) to be used instead of Bernat Blanket yarn
  2. Body, muzzle, ears, & limbs – use worsted weight yarn & hook 5 mm (H)
  3. Horns – use worsted weight yarn & hook 3.75 mm (F)
  4. Spots (make 4 or 5) – use worsted weight yarn & hook 3.5 mm (E), also omit the crab stitch edging
  5. Mane – use furry yarn & hook 3.75 mm (F), make it 18″ long
  6. Tail – 3 groups X 5 strands X 13″
  7. Buttons for eyes – 3/4″

PS: Do not forget to get the original pattern with step-by-step instructions from our website 🙂

Rusty the Giraffe Amigurumi Crochet Pattern by IraRott Rusty the Giraffe Amigurumi Toy Crochet Pattern by IraRott

You might also like these matching giraffe patterns (please click the pictures below to see the pattern pages). Save 20% on any 4 or more patterns purchased together at IraRott.com.

Rusty the Giraffe Giant Amigurumi and Crochet Giraffe Blanket Patterns by IraRott®

Rusty the Giraffe Crochet Blanket Pattern by IraRott

Rusty the Giraffe Rug Patterns by IraRott

Rusty the Giraffe Crochet Rug Pattern by IraRott

Rusty the Giraffe Security Blanket Patterns by IraRott

Rusty the Giraffe Crochet Security Blanket Pattern by IraRott

 

 

Mary Maxim Studio Yarn Review

We would like to introduce our NEW Sunrise Seashells Scarf Crochet Pattern made from gorgeous Mary Maxim Studio Yarn. This pattern was inspired by the calming sound of water, that helps me to relax. When I first saw the Studio Yarn in Chalk Pastels, I thought it would be just perfect for my idea of creating waves, seaweed, & seashells from yarn!

Free Crochet Wavy Scarf Pattern by IraRott

Sunrise Seashells Scarf Crochet Pattern by IraRott.

Purple Sand on Lake Erie Ontario Canada by IraRott

Purple Sand on Lake Erie. Ontario, Canada.

Lake Erie Ontario Canada by IraRott

Lake Erie. Ontario, Canada.

I love a smooth long color change of this variegated yarn, the combination of colors is harmonious and pleasing to the eye.

Mary Maxim Studio Yarn Review by IraRott

To make our Sunrise Seashells Scarf, you will need a 6 mm (J) crochet hook & 4 skeins of Mary Maxim Studio Yarn. This yarn is so easy to work with! A moderate amount of wool content (35%) gives it a natural organic feel but at the same time, it is very soft and pleasant to your skin.

Mary Maxim Studio Yarn Review by IraRott

Mary Maxim Studio is a bulky weight roving yarn, that is not twisted tightly or plied. Unlike many other roving yarns with a similar texture, I appreciate the fact that Studio Yarn doesn’t break when sewing!

Mary Maxim Studio Yarn Review by IraRott

 

Our new pattern is FREE, so please stop by to download your copy on our site.

Free Crochet Wavy Scarf Pattern by IraRott

 Disclaimer: The yarn for this projects was provided by Mary Maxim, but all notes in the article are my own opinions.

Crochet Quilt Top – Machine Tacking and Tying Tutorial

Backing is a piece of fabric (lining) attached to the back of the blanket to make it warmer & cozier. It creates a very neat finish to any project with stranded color work floats on the back. If you ever tried to add a fabric lining to your knit or crochet blanket by simply sewing it around the edges,  you might’ve noticed that the 2 layers of the blanket do not stay together nicely as your quilt top stretches differently than the backing fabric, which creates a mess & heaviness. Keeping that in mind, all layers of the blanket need to be sewn together around the edges as well as to be secured throughout the entire surface. This process is called quilting. Quilting is easy & fun, let’s do it together!

Crochet Quilt Top – Machine Tacking Tutorial by IraRott - How To Add Backing To Your Crochet Blanket

Crochet Giraffe Blanket Pattern by IraRott®

Crochet Quilt Top – Machine Tacking Tutorial by IraRott - How To Add Backing To Your Crochet Blanket

Crochet blanket with stranded colorwork floats (WITH backing versus NO Backing)

MATERIALS:

  1. Self-healing cutting mat
  2. Quilting ruler
  3. Rotary cutter with a 45 mm blade
  4. Fabric scissors
  5. Skip-cut (or skip-stitch) rotary cutter blade (45 mm) for wide space cuts
  6. Wonder clips or any other clips (optional)
  7. Fleece, Soft N Comfy, or Minky fabric – slightly larger in size than your finished blanket
  8. Lint roller (optional)
  9. Curved basting pins  or safety pins
  10. Tapestry needle
  11. Sewing machine (optional)
  12. Crochet hook 5 mm (H)
  13. Worsted weight yarn (Medium/4)
Crochet Quilt Top – Machine Tacking Tutorial by IraRott - How To Add Backing To Your Crochet Blanket

Materials

PREPARING FABRICS:

  1. Wet block your knit or crochet blanket before adding the lining. This will help to keep the edges straight and will balance the shape of the quilt top.
  2. Napped fabrics like Minky need to be placed on the blanket with the nap running down for more natural feel & look.
Crochet Quilt Top – Machine Tacking Tutorial by IraRott - How To Add Backing To Your Crochet Blanket

Napped fabrics

CUTTING FABRIC:

With the wrong sides together, lay out your knit/crochet blanket & the backing fabric. Line up the top right corner of both pieces & the perpendicular edges that meet in the corner. Then fold & cut the excess fabric along the opposite edges. The backing should be the same size as your blanket, no seam allowances are required.

Crochet Quilt Top – Machine Tacking Tutorial by IraRott - How To Add Backing To Your Crochet Blanket

Crochet Quilt Top – Machine Tacking Tutorial by IraRott - How To Add Backing To Your Crochet Blanket

Cut the excess fabric along the folded edges

NOTE: A sticky lint roller would be very handy for keeping your working area clean if you cut any fabrics with nap.

Crochet Quilt Top – Machine Tacking Tutorial by IraRott - How To Add Backing To Your Crochet Blanket

Keep your work area clean!

PERFORATION:

Change the blade in your rotary cutter to the Skip-cut (or skip-stitch) blade. Position the quilting ruler 3/4″ (19 mm) from the edge of the fabric & roll the skip-cut blade along the edges of the ruler to create perfectly-spaced perforations. Repeat around the entire edge of the backing fabric.

Crochet Quilt Top – Machine Tacking Tutorial by IraRott - How To Add Backing To Your Crochet Blanket

Perfectly-spaced perforations

CROCHET EDGES:

Use worsted weight yarn & 5 mm (H) crochet hook to finish the edges of the backing fabric.

Stitch summary (US terms):

Beg – beginning; Ch – chain; Sc – single crochet; Sl st – slip stitch; St – stitch.

Make a slip knot, then insert the hook from front to back through the perforation a few inches away from the corner; yarn over & pull it through the perforation; yarn over & pull through both loops on the hook (first sc made). Work around the perforated edge, folding the fabric edge towards the wrong side as you go –> *[Ch 1; sc in next perforation] repeat to the corner; (sc, ch 1, sc, ch 1, sc) in corner; repeat from* all the way around; sl st in top of beg st. Fasten off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

Crochet Quilt Top – Machine Tacking Tutorial by IraRott - How To Add Backing To Your Crochet Blanket Crochet Quilt Top – Machine Tacking Tutorial by IraRott - How To Add Backing To Your Crochet Blanket

ATTACHING BACKING:

With the wrong sides together, line up the edges of the top blanket & the backing. The backing should be slightly smaller than the quilt top after the edges are finished. Place clips evenly along the first edge to prepare the layers for sewing. You can use basting pins instead of clips, but try to avoid straight pins as they can easily get lost in-between crochet stitches. Using a tapestry needle & the long tail from finishing, back stitch along the clipped edge, removing clips as you go; then repeat the process around the remaining edges.

Crochet Quilt Top – Machine Tacking Tutorial by IraRott - How To Add Backing To Your Crochet Blanket

Crochet Quilt Top – Machine Tacking Tutorial by IraRott - How To Add Backing To Your Crochet Blanket

Crochet Quilt Top – Machine Tacking Tutorial by IraRott - How To Add Backing To Your Crochet Blanket

BASTING:

Basting is a common technique used for holding the layers of the quilt temporarily while it’s being quilted.

Flip the quilt to the right side & flatten out the layers. Pin both layers of the quilt, by placing basting pins about every 3″-5″ (7.5-12.5 cm) & working your way around the quilt.

Crochet Quilt Top – Machine Tacking Tutorial by IraRott - How To Add Backing To Your Crochet Blanket Crochet Quilt Top – Machine Tacking Tutorial by IraRott - How To Add Backing To Your Crochet Blanket

QUILTING:

Now let the fun begin, we are ready for quilting!

To begin the machine tacking process, clear your working space around the sewing machine, prepare the matching top threads & bobbins, then set your machine’s stitch length to 2. Insert the quilt in the machine & start quilting. Place your sewing machine needle in the spot where you have one of the basting pins; remove the pin, & secure the layers by stitching forward 3-5 stitches and reverse several times.  You can also use a zigzag with a zero stitch length. Now, depending on your machine, you can automatically cut the thread & move to the next pin, or move to the next pin without cutting the thread. Cut all thread floats & ends after you finish quilting.

Crochet Quilt Top – Machine Tacking Tutorial by IraRott - How To Add Backing To Your Crochet Blanket

Machine tacking

Crochet Quilt Top – Machine Tacking Tutorial by IraRott - How To Add Backing To Your Crochet Blanket

Setup for machine quilting

Crochet Quilt Top – Machine Tacking Tutorial by IraRott - How To Add Backing To Your Crochet Blanket

Trimming the ends

Here is my short video of the quilting process, see how easy it is?

If you do not have a sewing machine, not to worry! Instead of machine tacking, you can simply tie your quilt as it was done by our ancestors using a matching yarn or embroidery floss. Just thread the needle with the floss, then insert the needle from back to front through the quilt layers & then back up through a stitch away from the initial spot, leaving a 2” (5 cm) tail. Repeat one more time to reinforce. Cut thread, leaving a 2” (5 cm) tail. Tie the tails together with a double knot on the back side of the quilt. Trim the tails to approximately 1” (2.5 cm).

IraRott® Rusty the Giraffe Crochet Blanket Patter can be found at IraRott.com